The Survival Doctor

The latest posts from The Survival Doctor



by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Two weeks ago, I asked what you want to learn more about this year. The most popular answer was “advanced” techniques.

Last week, I covered some really advanced questions about smoke inhalation—even ones experts have trouble answering. You responded by making that article the most popular post with subscribers in almost three months. Thanks. I’ll keep going in this direction.

I have one more important set of questions for you, and then we’ll get back to survival medicine.

This year, I want to create the products you need—things that fill gaps and help you prepare in practical ways. So I’ve created a brief follow-up survey about that.

If you’d like to have your voice heard (whether or not you took the first survey), please click here. (There are only five questions.) I’m really listening, and I hope we can make this the best year yet for your medical prepping.

Thanks for your support.

>> Take the survey.
  • #af-form-1797332980 .af-body .af-textWrap{width:70%;display:block;float:right;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-body a{color:#880303;text-decoration:underline;font-style:normal;font-weight:normal;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-body input.text, #af-form-1797332980 .af-body textarea{background-color:#FFFFFF;border-color:#919191;border-width:1px;border-style:solid;color:#000000;text-decoration:none;font-style:normal;font-weight:normal;font-size:12px;font-family:Helvetica, sans-serif;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-body input.text:focus, #af-form-1797332980 .af-body textarea:focus{background-color:#FFFAD6;border-color:#030303;border-width:1px;border-style:solid;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-body label.previewLabel{display:block;float:left;width:25%;text-align:right;color:#000000;text-decoration:none;font-style:normal;font-weight:normal;font-size:12px;font-family:Helvetica, sans-serif;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-body{background-repeat:no-repeat;background-position:inherit;background-image:none;color:#000000;font-size:11px;font-family:Verdana, sans-serif;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-header{padding-bottom:1px;padding-top:1px;padding-right:10px;padding-left:75px;background-color:transparent;background-repeat:no-repeat;background-position:inherit;background-image:url("http://forms.aweber.com/images/forms/pointer/alert/header.png");border-width:5px;border-bottom-style:none;border-left-style:none;border-right-style:none;border-top-style:none;color:#880303;font-size:16px;font-family:Verdana, sans-serif;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-quirksMode .bodyText{padding-top:2px;padding-bottom:2px;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-quirksMode{padding-right:10px;padding-left:10px;} #af-form-1797332980 .af-standards .af-element{padding-right:10px;padding-left:10px;} #af-form-1797332980 .bodyText p{margin:1em 0;} #af-form-1797332980 .buttonContainer input.submit{background-color:#c20606;background-image:url("http://forms.aweber.com/images/forms/sign-up-below/big-red/button.png");color:#FFFFFF;text-decoration:none;font-style:normal;font-weight:normal;font-size:14px;font-family:Verdana, sans-serif;} #af-form-1797332980 .buttonContainer input.submit{width:auto;} #af-form-1797332980 .buttonContainer{text-align:center;} #af-form-1797332980 body,#af-form-1797332980 dl,#af-form-1797332980 dt,#af-form-1797332980 dd,#af-form-1797332980 h1,#af-form-1797332980 h2,#af-form-1797332980 h3,#af-form-1797332980 h4,#af-form-1797332980 h5,#af-form-1797332980 h6,#af-form-1797332980 pre,#af-form-1797332980 code,#af-form-1797332980 fieldset,#af-form-1797332980 legend,#af-form-1797332980 blockquote,#af-form-1797332980 th,#af-form-1797332980 td{float:none;color:inherit;position:static;margin:0;padding:0;} #af-form-1797332980 button,#af-form-1797332980 input,#af-form-1797332980 submit,#af-form-1797332980 textarea,#af-form-1797332980 select,#af-form-1797332980 label,#af-form-1797332980 optgroup,#af-form-1797332980 option{float:none;position:static;margin:0;} #af-form-1797332980 div{margin:0;} #af-form-1797332980 fieldset{border:0;} #af-form-1797332980 form,#af-form-1797332980 textarea,.af-form-wrapper,.af-form-close-button,#af-form-1797332980 img{float:none;color:inherit;position:static;background-color:none;border:none;margin:0;padding:0;} #af-form-1797332980 input,#af-form-1797332980 button,#af-form-1797332980 textarea,#af-form-1797332980 select{font-size:100%;} #af-form-1797332980 p{color:inherit;} #af-form-1797332980 select,#af-form-1797332980 label,#af-form-1797332980 optgroup,#af-form-1797332980 option{padding:0;} #af-form-1797332980 table{border-collapse:collapse;border-spacing:0;} #af-form-1797332980 ul,#af-form-1797332980 ol{list-style-image:none;list-style-position:outside;list-style-type:disc;padding-left:40px;} #af-form-1797332980,#af-form-1797332980 .quirksMode{width:325px;} #af-form-1797332980.af-quirksMode{overflow-x:hidden;} #af-form-1797332980{background-color:#FFFFFF;border-color:#C7A66D;border-width:1px;border-style:none;} #af-form-1797332980{display:block;} #af-form-1797332980{overflow:hidden;} .af-body .af-textWrap{text-align:left;} .af-body input.image{border:none!important;} .af-body input.submit,.af-body input.image,.af-form .af-element input.button{float:none!important;} .af-body input.text{width:100%;float:none;padding:2px!important;} .af-body.af-standards input.submit{padding:4px 12px;} .af-clear{clear:both;} .af-element label{text-align:left;display:block;float:left;} .af-element{padding:5px 0;} .af-form-wrapper{text-indent:0;} .af-form{text-align:left;margin:auto;} .af-header{margin-bottom:0;margin-top:0;padding:10px;} .af-quirksMode .af-element{padding-left:0!important;padding-right:0!important;} .lbl-right .af-element label{text-align:right;} body { }

    Subscribe for Free!Never miss a post or update.

    Email:

    BONUS: You'll also receive "The Survival Doctor's Ultimate Emergency Medical Supplies" report—FREE!

    We respect your email privacy.

Author: LAwordsmith
Posted: January 26, 2015, 11:00 am

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

The recent train disaster in Washington, D.C., reminded me that I haven’t covered smoke inhalation in my posts.

Picture this. You’re on a subway going through a tunnel when you hear a loud pop. The train stops, the lights go out, and the air starts filling with smoke. And it’s getting worse.

A voice comes over the intercom. “The train is not on fire. Please, everyone, sit on the floor and wait for help.” The voice orders you not to open the doors. You’re trapped.

In the D.C. event, which resulted in one woman dying and dozens being hospitalized, I don’t know why they weren’t allowed to evacuate. Perhaps because no one knew exactly what had happened and how safe it was to go out.

About 35 minutes later, emergency help arrived. But that means that in a major metropolitan city, all these people were trapped for over half an hour with no help. It’s a tragic example of not always being able to predict when or where an emergency will happen.

Many of the passengers probably thought they were just making a quick trip out. I mean, I’m guessing [... continue reading]

Author: LAwordsmith
Posted: January 19, 2015, 11:00 am

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Thank you for the wonderful response to last week’s survey. It will help me a great deal in focusing on what you’d most like to learn about.

As promised, here are the results.

1. What type of information would you like me to focus on most this year?

From this, it seems I have been going in the right direction, covering diseases in the blog and including advanced survival techniques in the blog, books and especially the training course.

I would just add a note that it’s important to get the basics down first, as I’m sure you’d agree. In an emergency, if the immediate threats to life are not corrected there may be no reason to do the advanced procedures. (That’s why I also cover some basics in nearly all my educational products.)

I’m interested to know more about what type of advanced information you want to learn, so I’ll be following up with a survey about that next week.

2. What topic would you like to learn most about this year?

This helps a lot. Thanks.

3. Which emergency-scenario [... continue reading]
Author: LAwordsmith
Posted: January 12, 2015, 11:00 am

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

My resolution for 2015 is for The Survival Doctor to focus even more on your needs. I want to help you prepare easier and quicker—in the exact ways you want to.

To that end, would you tell me how I can best help you by answering this five-question survey? It’ll only take about five minutes.

I want to know how you like to learn new things and what you most want to learn about. I’ve been soaking up medical information for over 40 years, so there’s a lot I could share. Where do you want me to focus?

After you take the survey, feel free to expound on your answers in the comments section below. I’ll share the survey results next week.

>> Take the survey.
Author: LAwordsmith
Posted: January 6, 2015, 11:00 am

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Thank you to for making 2014 another record year for The Survival Doctor. Compared to 2013 our viewership was up by over 10 percent (around 4.5 million visits total). And not surprisingly, our number one most-viewed post remained the same. Otherwise, the most popular posts really ran the gamut—earwax removal and fast heart rates, children’s rashes and knee injuries, eyelid infections and finger infections.

What about you? Did you learn anything new from any of them? Or perhaps they helped refresh your knowledge a bit? Which did you find the most interesting?

10. Slideshow: 12 Common Childhood Rashes

9. How to Know If You Really Have a Concussion

8. Get the Pus Out! How to Lance a Boil

7. How to Slow a Fast Heart Rate

6. Basic Stye Treatment: Always Do This, But Never Do That.

5. Earwax Removal: How to Clean Out Your Ears at Home

4. 8 Tips for How to Treat a Knee Injury and How to Know If It’s [... continue reading]

Author: James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.
Posted: December 29, 2014, 11:07 am

>> Looking for a meaningful last-minute gift? Click here for sales on my survival training courses. No shipping required.

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

The difference between cold and flu symptoms is somewhat a question of severity. Whereas a cold may make you feel like you’ve just run a race, the flu makes you feel like someone beat you with a baseball bat along the way. A cold can make you ache and feel fatigued. You can feel miserable and even run a low-grade fever or 100 F or so. But the flu puts you in the bed (where you should be). If you don’t listen to your body and take care of yourself, you could end up in the hospital. People die from the flu.

Just in time to celebrate the upcoming cold and flu season, here are my most popular posts about surviving colds and the flu for 2014.

10. 4 Common Causes of Coughs in Kids—With a Printable Chart

9. 8 Things You Can Do For the Full-Blown Flu

8. 4 Mistakes People Make When [... continue reading]

Author: James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.
Posted: December 22, 2014, 11:13 am

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Here in Colorado, we’ve already had some really cold days and then some sneaky mild ones. Sneaky because I get all comfortable going out with a light jacket one day; the next, the sky is clear, and it looks the same—from the inside. I walk out, and bam, it’s biting cold. Or the day is pretty mild and the night is freezing.

Winter is upon us, and I have this sneaky feeling it’s going to get colder before it gets warmer. So I went back and reviewed my previous posts for winter safety tips (hey, sometimes even I don’t remember every detail I’ve written). And below I’ve linked to the 10 most popular ones for 2014.

Even if you’ve read them, I’d suggest you, like me, could benefit from a review, to get you ready for the upcoming cold. And even if you live in a warm climate, check out number eight for sure.

10. How to Walk in the Snow Without Falling (Much)

9. Low Body Temperature: More Than Frostbite (and More Dangerous)

8. Why Winter Heart Attacks Are More Common No [... continue reading]

Author: James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.
Posted: December 16, 2014, 11:09 am

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

A few weeks ago a patient I was seeing in the office asked me to look at a copy of his lab work he’d received from an alternate medicine provider. It was the usual chemistry screen and all looked great, to me at least. But two figures were circled, a slightly low creatinine level and a slightly high BUN/creatinine ratio, and yes, the lab printout had those in the out-of-normal range. His provider had asked that he come back in several weeks and have them rechecked. The retest would cost around $150.

This jogged my memory of some wise advice one of my medical school professors taught: Doing a medical test is useless if you have no idea what you’re going to do with the results.

And you’re not going to do much if there’s no danger from a slight abnormality. This goes for everyday situations and survival ones.

Thinking It Through

Creatinine is one sign of how well your kidneys are working. Every day your body breaks down a small portion of your muscle, and creatinine is a byproduct. It’s excreted out your kidneys. The higher above normal your creatinine level is, [... continue reading]

Author: James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.
Posted: December 8, 2014, 10:29 am

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

What do asthma attacks and panic attacks have in common, besides the fact that they’re both more likely during a disaster?

They both cause you to hyperventilate (breathe faster), which in turn makes them worse.

There’s a breathing technique that can help stop the cycle. But it’s the opposite of what you probably think. It’s not deep breathing; it’s slow, shallow breathing. And practicing it can even help prevent attacks from coming on. But you have to learn to do it properly—preferably straight from a professional.

How Everyday Breathing Affects Attacks

Asthmatics and people prone to panic attacks (panic disorder) tend to breathe in some slightly different ways than others, which keeps their carbon dioxide at a slightly lower level.

In everyday living, you never think about needing to maintain the carbon dioxide level in your blood in a certain range. Your body just does it. If you’re perceived as having too much, you exhale a bit more to release it through your lungs. Too little and you breathe a bit slower. But the level your body decides you should live with can affect you in many ways, large [... continue reading]

Author: James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H.
Posted: December 3, 2014, 9:09 pm

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Today, I’m launching my first ever big holiday survival sale.

There are personalized gifts for under $20 plus deep discounts on training.

Has taking a great first aid or wilderness survival course been on your to-do list? Why not make 2015 the year of getting it done? With these specials, you could even take my course with a friend.

If some of The Survival Doctor products are on your own Christmas list, now’s the time to tell friends and family about them. They can get them for you at a discount, so, you know, you’d be doing them a favor by letting them know, right?

But don’t delay. That snail mail can be a bit overwhelmed during this time of year, and the sale is for a limited time only. In fact, I don’t know when I’ll offer these deals on the training course again, if ever.

Feel good about your purchase! Thank you for supporting a small business made in the USA.

Happy Thanksgiving Week!

Back when I was in medical school, my family [... continue reading]

Author: LAwordsmith
Posted: November 25, 2014, 8:58 pm




Rating 1 star lowest, 5 stars highest
Click stars to vote for The Survival Doctor


Comments are closed.