Canadian Preppers Network

The latest posts from Canadian Preppers Network



Food products are tough to review.  Simply, most reviews depend on individual tastes, which vary largely from one person to another.  That being said, I have reviewed food packages in the past that were OK and acceptable by my standards, as well as those of my family...and believe me, 5 year olds can be pretty picky!

Another issue with these food packages is that so many of them come from the US.  I have always tried to keep things on this blog as Canadian as possible, so when the folks over at Valley Food Storage contacted me about reviewing their products, I had a few questions for them regarding shipping issues.  They replied back quickly enough and assured me that they do ship product to Canada on a regular basis and have experienced no issues in regards to delays, or customs.

I received the package in about a week's time from the day I got the shipping notice.  It was a variety pack which included 4 packets...

Strawberry Cream of Wheat (5 servings)
Multigrain Cereal (5 servings)
Pasta Primavera (2 servings)
Enchalada Beans and Rice (2 servings)


So, let's get into these pouches and check them out one by one...

First off, we'll look at the strawberry cream of wheat.



I know the camera on the laptop isn't the best, but you can probably tell that it looks a bit watery.  That's because after following the instructions on the package, the result was a thick goop at the bottom of the bowl with a foamy water on top.  Waiting longer and stirring didn't help.  This was disappointing, as there was an inviting aroma of strawberries.  Believe me, the aroma was all there was...no strawberry taste whatsoever.  

Next, let's try the Multigrain cereal.


As you can see from the picture, I am using my butane camp stove for this review because that is what I will likely be using AT BEST when I need to get into my 25 year storage food.  Again, this cereal just didn't take up the water the way you would think it should.  The end result was a bland, thin bowl of plain grains.  As a matter of fact, this one went into the dog dish, and the pouches EVENTUALLY ate it up.

After 2 less than successful attempts at breakfast, time for the entres.

We'll start off with the Enchilada Beans and Rice.

 
This time, the directions offered an option for a thicker product by using 1/2 cup less water. Having learned my lesson already, I figured that would be a good idea to try.  After the recommended cook time (15 - 18 minutes) and the recommended stand time (another 5 to 7 minutes) I ended up with a bowl of something that looked quite appetizing.  I expected undercooked beans, but I was wrong.  The beans were tender, but the FD vegetables seemed a little tough, which is a common problem with these types of foods.  Unfortunately, it didn't take long for my palate to become overwhelmed with the taste of salt.  Another thing I notices was that I had a decent sized portion in front of me, but it was supposed to be a serving for 2...ok, maybe as a side dish, but definitely NOT for a meal, with this entire bowl packing a mere 460 calories.

Last, but  not the worst (fortunately) comes the Pasta Primavera.



Again, we can see a decent sized bowl of pasta here, but remember...that's 2 servings.  The sauce looked a little on the thin side, even after the recommended standing time, but once it cooled an extra minute or 2 in the bowl, it turned out all right.  The pasta had a good texture and the sauce actually had a cheesy flavor, not overwhelmingly salty, and was overall not bad!  The FD peas however, did cook a little unevenly with some being perfectly tender, and others being a tad crunchy still.  I have to admit that I did eventually eat the entire bowl as I sat down to write this review, so I guess we could call this one a success.

In general, I wasn't impressed with this line of food storage.  Sure, there was one good dish, but I would not pay the $11.95 US for what is supposed to be 2 servings.  Unfortunately, these products turned out to be overpriced and underwhelming.



Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: April 22, 2015, 2:00 pm

This Week On Movie Monday

Killer Tornadoes

Understanding How Tornadoes Destroy and Kill

 

With tornado season just around the corner,  I thought this might be a great topic to look at this week.  The majority of tornadoes reported in Canada occur between May and September.  Sure, there have been tornadoes from January through April, and also in November and December,but the possibilities really ramp up for the 5 months in between.

This documentary will cover tornadoes from the US, and unfortunately, a lot of people will think that those devastating EF5 storms just don't happen here.  Well, those people would all be wrong.  Although rated on the older F scale at an F5, the Eli Manitoba Tornado that struck on June 22, 2007 would easily qualify as an EF5 on the new Enhanced Fujita Scale.

In this movie, you will hear a lot of references to El Nino in relation to tornadic activity.  This year, the NOAAs Climate Prediction Center has predicted a 70% chance of El Nino effects this summer.

FACT

Canada experiences an average of 62 confirmed tornadoes per year





 These films are presented as an exception to the copyright act as fair dealing for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody or satire. See bill c-42 article 29.
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: April 21, 2015, 2:44 pm

Community. Do you have one?


 

If you answered yes then you are who some would consider to be the fortunate ones. You have either made a decision to be involved in one, live in one, or have created one around you. Your community may be the people you live close to, or the people with whom you spend your time. When people are suddenly in a situation where they are in need, it’s then that they recognize that they either do, or do not, have a community around them. Those who don’t may be alone for many reasons, but two stand out. Either they have chosen to live separately, or they live in an environment where everyone is so busy with their own lives that they don’t know the people next door. It is this latter group for whom this article is written.


 

After a disaster, one of the most common recorded statements is in reference to how the “community really came together”. Splashed across the news are stories of people helping one another, sharing resources to others in need or lending a hand to someone they hardly know. This is a wonderful phenomenon, but it’s sad that it takes a disaster to force us to meet our neighbours. Imagine if this same group of people had some idea of the skills and resources among them ahead of time. How much better prepared they would be!

 


So what can you do to help define the community that’s around you? There are the obvious answers – one being to get to know your neighbours, but for some that’s an intimidating prospect. Not sure where to start? Then try these well-known, but often neglected suggestions:

 



-          Go to or hold a neighbourhood BBQ


-          Garage sales – go chat with the neighbour who is hosting it, or host one yourself


-          Go for walks in your neighbourhood and look those you pass in the eye and say hi


-          Though somewhat cliché – go ask your neighbour for a cup of sugar. Really. Go do it.


-          If you hear that a neighbour has been ill, bring over a meal


-          Offer to help shovel a driveway or mow a yard


-          If someone new moves into your neighbourhood, bring them a plant or a treat and welcome them. Unfortunately this is a lost act of kindness in a lot of neighbourhoods.


 

There is strength to be found in having a community. If you don’t have one yet, then take a moment and reach out to those around you the next time an opportunity arises. You never know what lifelines you may be establishing without even realizing it.
 

 
Author: Total Prepare
Posted: April 20, 2015, 10:57 am
Even with the snow still lingering on the ground, now is the time to turn your attention to the outdoors and your food production for the coming season. Growing your own food is a sustainable way to prepare yourself for hard times. With some simple storage and preservation methods, you can produce some of your own food storage right out of the dirt!

When planning your garden, think preparedness. Try to grow foods that are nutritious and can be stored. Of course, having a way to can, dehydrate, or cold store your produce not only helps, but is a must for the prepper gardener. In fact, I have a hard time thinking of something that I grow that can’t be preserved for later use by at least 2 of those methods.

Be creative and search out new ideas for storing your produce. I used to grow a very limited amount of greens because there was no really good way to preserve them and the kids wouldn’t eat them anyways. However, I just came across a really neat blog post suggesting that I dehydrate them and use a blender to turn it all into powder which could be used in soups, stews, sprinkled on salads, even hidden in a meatloaf mix! Sounds like a great idea, and this year I will surely be opening up some new ground for more greens.

We all know that we should eat what we store and store what we eat…well the same goes for growing. There is really no point to growing wax beans if your family just doesn’t like them. There are a few exceptions to this however, like the trick I use in my pasta sauce of putting zucchini in a blender,then mixing it into the tomatoes while cooking it down. Not only do I get a boost of nutrition, but it stretches the tomato crop that much further(and the kids are none the wiser).

Keep an eye on the frost date for your area. Believe it or not, you may be closer than you think to have to start long season crops indoors. The information on the back of your seed packs will let you know how long before the last frost that they need to get a much needed head start so that you can get the expected yield. If you haven’t ordered your seeds from a catalog yet, it may already be too late for some of the early starters. That doesn’t mean that you’ve missed the boat completely though as almost every hardware store, grocer, and yard center already have their seed selection out on display. If you look closely enough, you will even find some heirloom varieties too!

Don’t be afraid to try new things…especially if you have a problematic crop from years past. Even I admit that there are just some things I can’t get the hang of growing well. My nemesis is peas. Try as I may, year after year, I just don’t get a crop, so out they go from my plans. Instead, I’ll try using the space for a dryer bean that I can use to supplement the protein shelf in the pantry. Besides, I can live just fine without peas!

Don’t forget to keep track of how much you plant and how much you harvest. I use a database I made in Access, but a pen and paper will work just as well. Once the season has come to an end and the stalks are all in the compost pile(you DO have a compost pile, DON”T YOU?) then you can look back and make adjustments. What crops were you short on? Plant more of that one accordingly next year. What crops were you giving to friends until they hid inside their homes when they saw you coming with yet another armload? Dedicate less space to that one going forward.

Let’s not forget about seasonings. I always have space dedicated to herbs to season my food with. Don’t add too much to foods that you plan on canning as the end result will be less than ideal, but dry and store them seperately and add them as you cook for dinner.

Some final points:

1 – grow what you eat
2 – have a way to preserve it
3 – start early seeds indoors now (or very soon)
4 – track sow/harvest and make adjustments in subsequent years
5 – leave space for herbs and seasonings

Now, stop reading and go get your hands in the dirt!
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: April 17, 2015, 11:00 am



Building your own food and water back up emergency supply is a smart plan to incorporate in the face of an unexpected emergency or serious disaster. FEMA recommends storing at least a two-week supply. However, most survival experts believe a three-day supply should be sufficient for an immediate response to a bad situation. With just a bit of forethought, careful planning, and regular maintenance, anyone can easily create and maintain a basic emergency food storage supply. Here’s some key information regarding which foods to select and how to properly store them as well as how to maintain your fresh water supply.

Emergency Water Storage Tips

In an emergency situation, having enough clean water to drink is one of the top priorities to consider. The average person needs a minimum of two quarts every day. People living in warmer climates, nursing mothers, young children, and sick people need even more. Water is also necessary for proper hygiene and adequate food preparation. Stockpile at least one gallon per day per person. Consider stockpiling a two-week supply of fresh water for every member of the family. If this isn’t possible, just store as much as you possibly can.

If your supplies are running somewhat low, never try to ration water. Just try to drink the amount you require today, and look for more tomorrow. Reduce your activity level and stay cool in order to minimize how much water your body requires.

For the healthiest results, buy food-grade water supply containers from camping or surplus supply stores to use for your long-term emergency water storage.

Stockpiling Emergency Food

• Store your emergency food in a dry, cool, dark place. A basement is an ideal place to store food since it’s darker and cooler than the rest of the house. Be sure your area is easy to get to if there’s any damage done to your home or if flooding occurs in the basement. If your home doesn’t have a basement, use the crawl space or a closet centrally located in the home, whereby the support beams would hopefully support the bulk of the roof during a serious storm or earthquake.

• Make sure all food items are properly sealed in quality airtight containers. Store any loose packages of nuts, dried fruits, and sugar in sealable, airtight jars in order to protect your storage food from any subsequent water damage or pests.

• Use high-calorie food choices that offer a great deal of nutrition and don’t need refrigeration. In general, dry foods like beans, white rice, and pasta have an extended shelf life and provide numerous calories as well. For a bit of variety, protein bars, nuts, and dried fruits are all excellent choices. Chocolate candies aren’t the most nutritious food, but serve to lift your spirits during a difficult emergency or disaster, which is a great help if there are young children in the home.

• Check your food storage periodically for any items that may be past their expiration date. When selecting items to eat, take the first-in, first-out approach. This method will help you preserve your food to make it last longer. While most commercial emergency food kits come equipped with the date on which they were originally packaged, any other food needs to be marked using a permanent marker in order to keep track of the date.

Food Storage Containers

Any food items you intend to store for an indefinite period of time should be properly stored in food-grade containers. Containers like these won’t transfer any non-food or toxic chemicals into your food. Usually, a food-grade container has the acronym ‘HDPE’ stamped on it or a #2 near the recycle symbol. Thoroughly clean your containers with warm soapy water, rinse, and completely dry before storing any food in them. Also, be sure the lid you buy for your food-grade container is both spill-proof and airtight. Gamma lids and lids with gaskets are perfect since they don’t require an opener.

Healthy Nutrition Tips

During a disaster and after it’s over, it’s crucial to maintain your physical strength. Consider the following:

• Drink enough water to allow your body to properly function; ideally 2 – 4 quarts per day.
• Eat at least one nutritious meal every day.
• Consume enough calories to perform any work that’s necessary in your situation.

Lastly, include a vitamin supplement in your emergency food storage supply to make sure both you and your family are getting an adequate amount of nutrition when you need it most.
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: April 15, 2015, 11:00 am
Movie Mondays have been a popular and informative posting series here at the CPN.  I've shared more than a few documentaries from the BBC and National Geographic.  As you could imagine, it's not always easy to find something relevant and interesting to post.  To help out with that, I've turned to my friend Che from the OPSN and shared a few of his videos.  Following on that same path, I recently got in touch with the folks at 7 Trumpets Prepper and gotten their permission to share this weeks presentation. 



Although not Canadian, this is one of the topics that crosses the border seamlessly.  Canadians have access to all the hardware and tools needed, not to mention an abundance of wood to use in the project.

This video stems from an appearance on Doomsday Preppers season 2 and is the best instructional piece I have ever seen on the subject.  So, with no further adue, and with thanks to Cameron from 7 Trumpets Prepper, enjoy!


This video is presented with permission from 7 Trumpets Prepper.
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: April 13, 2015, 11:00 pm


Outdoor Cooking Tips for the Average Joe

While outdoor cooking is more of a recreational activity, when disaster strikes and we’re all going to be out in the woods building shelter and making fire, we won’t have a choice but to do it every day. We might as well get good at it right now…
There are plenty of articles with tips and tricks on how to make fire even in the most adverse conditions (can you believe you can use an ice to make one?) but very few on how to cook on it.  Outdoor cooking isn’t hard but one wrong move and the fire is out or the food gets burnt. It all depends on the cooking method and that’s the first thing I want to discuss.
The main ways to cook outdoors include:
·         cooking on a rock next to an open fire (it can’t get simpler than this)
·         cooking on open fire (as long as you have a fireproof container such as a camping pot)
·         cooking on a grill placed on open fire
·         cooking over coal by wrapping food in aluminum foil or even leaves
·         using more advanced tools such as the volcano grill
The cooking method you use is dictated primarily by the type of food you have and by the cooking utensils you have at your disposal. And before we move on to the tips, the thing I want you to remember is that you can always find a way to cook something. Some of the cooking tips below might even surprise you…
Outdoor cooking tip #1: don’t cook over the flame. There are exceptions to this (such as when you want to fry something) but most foods need to be cooked on the coal, not on the flame. This is how most newbies manage to burn the food.
Let the fire settle down first until it burns down to coal, that’s when you get a more even heat that will better cook the food. When the coal starts to look brightly-red, that’s your queue to place your food on it.
Outdoor cooking tip #2: use tinfoil for open fire cooking
This is one of the easiest ways to cook on an open fire. You just wrap the food in tinfoil and place it on the burning coal. Make sure the fire has slowed down first, you don’t want the flame to burn down the foil.
Even so, you’re still gonna want to use heavy duty foil to make sure it holds through high temperatures. If ashes get inside your food, you’re not gonna like the taste so much. If you’re using regular tinfoil, you can just wrap the food twice to obtain the same result.
Outdoor cooking tip #3:use oil or grease on the grill to prevent the food from sticking
Outdoor cooking tip #4: use a paper bag
The reason I like this outdoor cooking method so much is because it doesn’t require a grill or any fancy cooking equipment. All you need is a brown paper bag which will be placed directly on the coal. The trick to making sure it doesn’t burn is you put inside something greasy, such as bacon. The fat in it is the one responsible for the bag not bursting into flames. (There’s a video showing how to do this on YouTube right here.)
Outdoor cooking tip #5: cooking AROUND an open fire
Rock frying is one of the easiest ways to cook something. You just make your fire, put a large flat rock next to it (to allow the heat to penetrate it) and you put your meat or whatever you want to cook on that rock when it’s hot enough.
That rock is going to be on one side of the fire so, if you have more stuff to cook you just need to put more rocks and more wooden planks around it. Of course, rock frying is something of a last resort in outdoor cooking due to the fact that you have to place your food directly on the rock, making it less than ideal.
Outdoor cooking tip #6: your food should not be thicker than 1.5 inches.
If it’s more than an inch and a half thick, you might end up with food that’s overcooked on the outside and raw on the inside.
Outdoor cooking tip #7: put liquid soap on the outside of the pots you use will make it easier for you to clean them afterwards.
Outdoor cooking tip #8: always keep your food hung in a tree somewhere as the smell may attract wildlife. Better yet, put it in sealed containers since it might even attract humans! Post-SHTF, of course.
Outdoor cooking tip #9:
There’re a couple of tricks to making fire in a way that won’t give away your location. The first one is to do it right below a tree; the branches will dissipate the smoke as it goes up. The second one is to continuously feed the fire with tinder. Obviously, making fire under a tree requires you to be ultra-careful even after you extinguish it.
Outdoor cooking tip #10: be patient
Just because the meat looks good on the outside, this doesn’t mean it’s fully cooked on the inside… unless you like it rare. Make sure you allow enough time for your food to cook and don’t be fooled by how it looks on the outside.
Outdoor cooking tip #11:if you happen to burn one of your fingers, grab with it one of your earlobes. The natural oils will block the air from coming into contact with the burnt skin.

Learn More by visiting Survival Sullivan
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: April 8, 2015, 12:28 pm

Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: April 1, 2015, 11:00 am


On April 6-12, grow your knowledge for organic living. Grow it faster than if you read a wheelbarrow's load of the best books on food production, harvesting and preserving.

April 6-12, the Home Grown Food Summit will host 35 presentations from experts, across a variety of organic food topics.




(Presentations from experts who'd be the authors of many of the books that would otherwise load your "To-Read" wheelbarrow. FYI)

The Summit draws together educators who are passionate about sharing and improving knowledge around organic food production.

So passionate... they are sharing their experiences and secrets.

For Free.

The Summit offers you a quick way to walk through the details of acquiring skills for organic living. Skills that you might miss out on for lack of understanding some simple tips and tricks.

Get the details here about the Home Grown Food Summit.
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: March 27, 2015, 4:07 pm


We’ve all been there…early in the morning, calling into the boss to tell them that we won’t be in that day for any multitude of reasons.  It could be a bout with the flu, strained back, or something else along those lines.  When we leave that message, we pop some OTCs and head back to bed, hoping that things will be better the next day.

Unfortunately, when the poop has hit the propeller, going back to bed really won’t be an option.  There are any number of tasks that have to be performed such as watch duty, wood splitting, water gathering, and so on.  Not to mention that everyday chores that we dutifully perform without a thought will be much more labor intensive.  If you don’t believe me, try making your morning cup of joe without anything electric.

Simply put, tasks will need do get done whether you feel up to it or not.
Here are some suggestions of normal OTC medications you should have on hand…

Pain Relievers: Anacin, Tylenol, Advil, or whatever works for you in the strength you normally take

Cold & Flue Remedies:  Look for tablet form such as Tylenol Cold, or similar.  Daytime/Nighttime duo packs are handy.

Allergy Relief:  Benadryl or similar products may also be effective for insect bites & stings as well as poison ivy and other irritants.

Specialized products:  Mydol, Aleve (naproxen) , Robax, etc.

Antibiotics:  Look for antibiotic ear drops and eye drops for minor infections.  Polysporin is one brand that is available over the counter, however, you will have to ask your pharmacist and may be asked for your name and personal info such as address and telephone number. (you should also seek information on fish antibiotics and how to diagnose for their use)

Remember, there is plenty of evidence out there that supports the effectiveness of tablet form medications well beyond their expiry date.  Generic brands such as Costco’s Kirkland often contain the exact same medicinal ingredients and are available at a discount when compared to name brand.  Read the labels to compare.
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: March 24, 2015, 7:44 pm


Canada – meet Relief Foods.  Relief Foods, meet Canada.  We know you are going to be good friends. We are proud to be the exclusive Canadian distributors of Legacy Premium Foods, and for Relief Foods as well! Why another freeze dried food line? How is Relief Foods different from Legacy? Why would I choose one over the other? Well, let us tell you.

http://totalprepare.ca/product/150-serving-entree-breakfast-bucket/

Why another Freeze Dried Food Line?
Legacy Premium Foods has supplied thousands of Canadians with long term food storage. Its 25 year shelf life, 19 different entrées, 4 breakfasts, hearty serving sizes, delicious taste and convenient storage buckets have made it a favourite choice for Canadians. This is the food you want if you are feeding hardy people with hefty appetites and wanting lots of variety in your long term food storage.

Relief Foods is specifically made for families with little people in mind. Total Prepare wanted to have an equally excellent product to stand beside Legacy Foods that fit a variety of family budgets. The quality of Relief Foods stands up to that of Legacy Foods and boasts the same amazing advantages: 25 year shelf life, great tasting, non-GMO, gluten free options and convenient storage buckets.

How is Relief Foods different from Legacy?
What sets Relief Foods apart, is that it offers more servings per pouch (6) that are sized to suit families with children. Although the menu is simpler, what really sets it apart are the drinks that come with both the essential and premium combo buckets. Also, those who can’t eat gluten will be thrilled to know Relief Foods offers a delicious gluten-free oatmeal, so your breakfast supply is covered too.  

http://totalprepare.ca/product/90-serving-gluten-free-fruit-lover-bucket/
But there’s more. The little darling of Relief Foods is its 90 Serving Fruit Lover Bucket (also gluten free!). We were caught by surprise at how many fruit buckets started flying out the door when we introduced Relief Foods to our customers. 90 servings of yummy dried apples, bananas and mangos have proven to be a hit! It’s the perfect supplement to your long term food storage.

Why would I choose one over the other?
We can honestly say they are both wonderful choices. You will be right with either of them. If you would like a wider variety of large sized meals, then Legacy is for you. If you are building your emergency food supply but have a tight family budget to balance and smaller appetites to satisfy, then Relief Foods would be the way to go.

Either way you choose, you are getting the best freeze dried food Canada has to offer from two companies whose mission it is to make food storage a healthy, simple and viable experience for all.

Learn about Legacy Premium Food Storage.  Click here.
Learn about Relief Foods. Click here

In celebration of our new product line, we are offering a 66 Serving Essential Combo Bucket for this month’s Canadian Preppers Network giveaway.  Are you ready to get to know Legacy or Relief Foods better? Then call us today or visit our website and we will get this friendship started!   

 Canada's #1 Source for Emergency Preparedness


Author: Total Prepare
Posted: March 13, 2015, 9:51 pm
Bomb Calorimeter
A bomb calorimeter is used to measure the food energy that is in a food item. So if you want to know how much food storage you need to survive for a month, you could stick some samples inside one of these babies, light it up, and then hire a scientist to interpret the results.

However, these bomb calorimeters are not used to create the numbers you see on today's nutritional labels because they burn everything, and the body does not. A bomb meter thus gives a higher food energy number than what is realistic.

Nutritional label numbers come from a much more scientific method: estimation. To create a nutritional label, chemical tests are run on the common ingredients within the product to estimate the energy density of the components. Then those energy densities are averaged against some charts and added up.

Now look at all those cans, jars and buckets in your basement! What a testament to your preparedness. That took some work. You've been told the stats, store 'x' amount of calories per person per day, so you used the nutritional labels best you could to make sure you would have enough for your family.

I am here to tell you today that not all calories and servings are created equal.
A) Nutritional label creation is not an exact process
B) Companies that manufacture product can adjust the label with a wide degree of variation to suit their purposes. A serving of the exact same product could be labelled 1/4 cup by company 'A' or 1 cup by company 'B' , resulting in packaging that states 50 servings, 5 servings or 5000. Whatever they want it to say to make it sound good.

Over the coming weeks and months, I intend to dive very deep into what makes up the servings and calories behind many of the food items available in our prep industry today. It's going to be very revealing and telling. And it should be a good education for all of us - helping us get an apples to apples look at the food we are storing. You deserve to know and understand this.

I would highly encourage you to jump on our newsletter list to be notified when and where my research becomes available. You can find the sign up form at the bottom of our homepage. See you soon.

This post by Dwight from Briden Solutions - Proudly helping Canadians obtain high quality Survival supplies.   
Author: Briden Solutions
Posted: March 6, 2015, 11:58 pm

Cam and Michelle Mather are hosting another one of their fantastic workshops!




The Hands-On, Solar Powered, Off-Grid, Personal Independence and Resilience, All You Can Grow, Ready for Rough Times Workshop

 

 


The next workshop will take place on Saturday, April 25, 2015. Cost is $120 per person and includes morning and afternoon refreshments and lunch. Two books will also be provided to each participant. If you are interested in attending please email m.d.mather at gmail dot com.

For more information please visit their website here


Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: February 23, 2015, 9:01 pm
BrianSandman

Episode 28 Season 2 – Barefoot Bushcraft Radio Show

Saturday, February 21st, 2015

In this episode of the Barefoot Bushcraft Radio Show we discuss:

 - Winter

- The perfect time to go camping

 - New Booking System at Barefoot Bushcraft

 - 10 things to have in a 72 Hour Survival Kit

 - Special Guest: Leather Care Specialist Brian  

subscribe-on-itunes
Author: Barefoot Bushcraft
Posted: February 21, 2015, 4:00 pm


It’s 5am. I sit here, having woken out of a deep sleep with such a start that it launched me out of bed and into the general blurry direction of my laptop. My article! It’s due today! The screen blinds me as I try to make my sleepy fingers type. My brain strains to string coherent thoughts together. What was my article supposed to be on again? Oh right…getting prepared when it is quiet.


I had a whole month of quiet. Well, as quiet as a busy family with three active teenagers and two working parents can be. I thought of my article many times. “Lots of time!” I told myself. 5am, on my day off no less, laughs at me.

Then it hits me – this is only a small taste of what it feels like to be thrown into an unexpected situation, even though you know the unexpected “could” happen someday. What if this had been an earthquake? THE earthquake. The Big One that haunts us here on the West Coast of Canada? Would I be thinking the same thing? I had a quiet month. Why didn’t I prepare?

Over Christmas we had a number of rumbles in our area that sent a flurry of motivated people to our store to finally get that earthquake kit they’ve been meaning to get for the past 10 years. We rejoiced with every call. Yay! Another family set with the necessities to survive! Our existence as a company was affirmed - this is why we love what we do.

Now that the rumbles have ceased, so too has died down the customers who responded from the gentle kick in the derriere from Mother Nature. The same phenomenon happened when those two cases of Ebola hit Texas last fall. Two cases! That’s all it took to wipe out our manufacturer’s supply of emergency freeze dried food and in turn, our supply of food. We were out within the month. That was our wake up call.  As an emergency preparedness company, we too, need to be prepared!

It’s quiet. NOW is the time to get prepared. Don’t flirt with the clock assuming that you can put off to tomorrow, again, whatever you have left to prepare. Stop for a moment and think through the scenario of having life disrupted for a day, a week, a month. If this were to happen to you at 5am tomorrow morning, would you too be stumbling around blindly, trying to gather your thoughts let alone your family and then all your supplies scattered around the house? Don’t let procrastination be the death of you. Finish getting ready, strike a huge check mark through that item on your list, and reward yourself with the peace of mind that comes from being prepared.

http://totalprepare.ca

Author: Total Prepare
Posted: February 13, 2015, 8:29 pm
I've been through a few real situations where life was on the line, and a few where it was borderline becoming real. And I've found that there is a very interesting few seconds between realizing there is a problem and deciding how your going to react. It's the few seconds where your gut feels like your going to heave. Then your brain clicks on and you start through your check list. Or not and you run. Which is it going to be?

Here are my 10 Tips to get over the few seconds of terror and turn your brain on.

1) Run through as many scenarios in advance as your time allows. Fight or flight? There are some scenarios where running the other direction is the appropriate response. Think about that before hand.
2) BREATHE! Take a few deep breaths.
3) Do an honest check of your gear and supplies in advance. Are they sufficient, or are you just kidding yourself? Real prepping brings peace of mind, that's the whole goal.
4) Don't listen to information from the masses. It's mostly hype or drama. Check your go-to trusted sources and get real intel on what's really happening.
5) Turn around. If the situation allows, turn around and walk the other way for a few steps so you are not staring directly at the disaster. Let your mind reset on a scene that's not chaos.
6) Disconnect for a few seconds. Try to remember what you doing or thinking before chaos hit. Were you writing the grocery list? That easy thought alone is enough to get your mind over the hump.
7) Use the buddy system. As long as it's not your buddy that's the problem, having a work / travel / home buddy can be great when you need a smack to come back to reality.
8) Look for the simplest solution. Do I have to go straight forward? Or can I go around this?
9) Don't overthink the situation. This goes with the above, but if you have 100 injured in front of you, just start with the closest.You can only help one at a time anyways. Don't stress about what you can't fix.
10) Consider that you've just been handed a lemon - is there any way to make lemonade? You were 4x4'ing in the forest and a fallen tree has blocked your route home and you don't have the supplies to overnight. Instead of walking around cursing, realize you've just been handed a great test of your skills. What can you use to cut or move this tree? Prove to yourself that you are the hero and come home with a great story to tell.  

This post by Dwight from Briden Solutions - Proudly helping Canadians obtain high quality Survival supplies.  
Author: Briden Solutions
Posted: February 6, 2015, 3:00 pm

WINTER BUSHCRAFT ADVENTURE


Your aircraft has gone down, and it is winter in the Rocky Mountains...would you be able to survive?



Aurora Bushcraft & Survival wants to show you how!

Learn firebuilding, navigation, knife and saw safety and cutting techniques, winter survival, shelter building, winter foraging and snow travel on a weekend long winter bushcraft adventure in the challenging environment of Southwestern Alberta's winter.



"Aurora Bushcraft & Survival strives to deliver quality outdoor education by giving participants knowledge relevant to the outdoor world they know today. We believe in environmental stewardship, fostering relationships between people and nature, and promoting safe outdoor practices. Through this, we deliver experiences that are second to none. Based in the Calgary area, our courses are for anyone wanting to learn bushcraft, wilderness living, and survival skills." - Aurora Bushcraft & Survival website

About the instructors -



Connor NoyesLead Instructor

Connors passion for the outdoors sparked as a youth exploring the Alberta Badlands and the Boreal Forest and waters of Ontario. Through organizations such as Scouts and Army Cadets, he grew up learning outdoor skills and leadership, eventually transpiring into a career teaching in the outdoors. His love of the wild lies in traditional skills, such as woodcraft, archery, canoeing, and bushcraft. Having instructed for organizations such as the Venture Centre in the UK, the Calgary Canoe Club, the Calgary Outdoor Centre, and for Scouts Canada Chinook Council, he is driven to deliver the best instruction possible, and skills that will last you a lifetime.
PictureAndrea Sebok
Instructor

What we know about Andrea is that she grew up on a farm and we guess she never left. Andrea is right at home in the bush- whether its paddling into the wind across a lake, or foraging in knee deep snow to collect sap for Spruce gum, she loves every minute of it. When not teaching, Andrea works as an Animal Health Technician, specializing mainly in large animals. Her passions for the outdoors include snowshoeing, paddling, snowboarding, and on occasion you will find her flying through the mountains by quad. Her passion for teaching started in college, coaching high school volleyball and now is applied to teaching for Scouts Canada, and for ABCs. 
The winter bushcraft course runs from February 27th to March 1st at Beaver Mines Lake, Alberta.
The cost is only $220.00, which includes food, by the way.
But...members of the Canadian Preppers Network will receive a $50.00 rebate and pay only $170.00.
 For more information, or to sign up for the course:
Website:
Email:
Phone:

403-805-3441
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: February 4, 2015, 3:36 pm
This Week On Movie Monday

Che, from the Ontario Preppers Survival Network is a major contributor to the preparedness community not only in Ontario, but across the country. Every summer, Che hosts the Ontario Preppers Annual Meetup, where a multitude of leaders in the preparedness community gather to share their knowledge. Che himself is an experienced leader, and has begun filming some of his presentations, such as this one called Dehydrators, Homemade MRE's & Mylar Bag Sealing - A Beginner Preppers Guide. He has graciously given the CPN permission to air this presentation as a part of Movie Mondays.




Don't forget to visit Che's site, the Ontario Prepper Survival Network
And also check out his YouTube Channel
If you want more information about the annual meet, visit Ontario Prepper & Self Reliance Meet




This film is presented with the express permission of OntarioPreppers.ca.
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: February 3, 2015, 1:00 am
Luke McLaughlin

Episode 27 Season 2 - Barefoot Bushcraft Radio Show

Saturday, January 25th - 2015

In this episode of the Barefoot Bushcraft Radio Show

 - Surprising insights into the effects of wood fuel burning
 - Leatherman Tread Wearable Tool Kit
 - Bartering after a collapse
 - Special Guest Luke McLaughlin from Holistic Survival School  



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Author: Barefoot Bushcraft
Posted: January 24, 2015, 1:00 pm
vieira_and_his_jeep

Episode 26, Season 2 Barefoot Bushcraft Radio Show

Saturday, January 17th, 2015

In this episode of the Barefoot Bushcraft Radio Show:

 - Couple Sues Government of Canada for tree falling on tent

 - Tuning a primitive bow

 - Psychology of Prepping

 - Re-design of www.barefootbushcraft.com

 - Nicholaus Vieira of Crazycaver.com  


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Author: Barefoot Bushcraft
Posted: January 17, 2015, 3:50 pm

Season 2, Episode 25

Saturday, January 10th - 2015

In this episode of the Barefoot Bushcraft Radio show, we discuss

 - Letter from a listener
 - Things they don't tell you on an Antarctic expedition
 - Putting Serving on a Bow string
 - Prepping Food
 - Special Guest Jimmy McSparron of  manusurvival.com

[Click Here To Download Episode]

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Author: Barefoot Bushcraft
Posted: January 11, 2015, 2:46 am


Living through an emergency event is stressful enough to your health, but what if you have an immune system that is compromised by the things you eat and you are suddenly thrust into a situation where your food options are limited even further? I think about that a lot because I, too, am celiac.

Thankfully the choices available to those who can’t eat certain foods are getting more plentiful. Bread options that used to taste worse than cardboard are now surpassing their gluten-laden counterparts in quality and delectability. 

There are numerous theories out there as to why we, in this day and age, are suffering more than those from a couple of generations before us, but we’ll save that discussion for another day because then I’d have to change the title of this article. Though natural food is always the better choice, what the rising number of sensitivities and allergens means is that those who grow our food, process our food and supply us with our food are far better off if they pay attention to the changing needs of those who consume the food.

http://totalprepare.ca/shop/freeze-dried-emergency-food/gluten-free-products/
When we found Legacy Premium Freeze Dried Food, not only were we excited about the great taste, the high quality ingredients (GMO free!), the 25 year shelf life and the large serving sizes per package, but we were thrilled that Legacy also carried gluten-free options!

Legacy really cares about what their consumers are eating. In fact, we had a customer who was extremely allergic to cumin and there was question as to whether cumin was hidden in the noncommittal ingredient term “and spices”. Knowing was important to our customer if she was going to be living off this food for any length of time after an emergency so Legacy cheerfully went to great lengths to come back to us within 24 hours with an answer. We now have a happy customer who won’t lose precious energy dealing with an angry immune system while she’s navigating the disaster around her.

http://totalprepare.ca/shop/freeze-dried-emergency-food/bulk-single-items/
Legacy Essentials and MegaOne Shakes are also gluten-free which gives the home prepper even more delicious and nutritious options. The problem will be to resist raiding the emergency supply for use in your daily meal preparations.   
 
http://totalprepare.ca/shop/freeze-dried-emergency-food/megaone-meal-replacement-shakes/
Spread the word to your celiac friends. In a world where gluten-free is often an afterthought, it’s refreshing to have choices because somebody thought of us. It should also be noted that food limitations aren’t just limited to those with celiac disease. We, at Total Prepare, can help even the cumin avoiders of the world. Call us to help you find emergency food that will fit your dietary needs so you too can count on your full health in the event of an emergency.
Author: Total Prepare
Posted: January 10, 2015, 12:23 am

WINTER BUSHCRAFT ADVENTURE


Your aircraft has gone down, and it is winter in the Rocky Mountains...would you be able to survive?



Aurora Bushcraft & Survival wants to show you how!

Learn firebuilding, navigation, knife and saw safety and cutting techniques, winter survival, shelter building, winter foraging and snow travel on a weekend long winter bushcraft adventure in the challenging environment of Southwestern Alberta's winter.



"Aurora Bushcraft & Survival strives to deliver quality outdoor education by giving participants knowledge relevant to the outdoor world they know today. We believe in environmental stewardship, fostering relationships between people and nature, and promoting safe outdoor practices. Through this, we deliver experiences that are second to none. Based in the Calgary area, our courses are for anyone wanting to learn bushcraft, wilderness living, and survival skills." - Aurora Bushcraft & Survival website

About the instructors -



Connor NoyesLead Instructor

Connors passion for the outdoors sparked as a youth exploring the Alberta Badlands and the Boreal Forest and waters of Ontario. Through organizations such as Scouts and Army Cadets, he grew up learning outdoor skills and leadership, eventually transpiring into a career teaching in the outdoors. His love of the wild lies in traditional skills, such as woodcraft, archery, canoeing, and bushcraft. Having instructed for organizations such as the Venture Centre in the UK, the Calgary Canoe Club, the Calgary Outdoor Centre, and for Scouts Canada Chinook Council, he is driven to deliver the best instruction possible, and skills that will last you a lifetime.
 
PictureAndrea Sebok
Instructor

What we know about Andrea is that she grew up on a farm and we guess she never left. Andrea is right at home in the bush- whether its paddling into the wind across a lake, or foraging in knee deep snow to collect sap for Spruce gum, she loves every minute of it. When not teaching, Andrea works as an Animal Health Technician, specializing mainly in large animals. Her passions for the outdoors include snowshoeing, paddling, snowboarding, and on occasion you will find her flying through the mountains by quad. Her passion for teaching started in college, coaching high school volleyball and now is applied to teaching for Scouts Canada, and for ABCs. 
 
The winter bushcraft course runs from February 27th to March 1st at Beaver Mines Lake, Alberta.
The cost is only $220.00, which includes food, by the way.
But...members of the Canadian Preppers Network will receive a $50.00 rebate and pay only $170.00.
 
 For more information, or to sign up for the course:
Website:
 
Email:
 
Phone:
403-805-3441
 

 



Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: January 9, 2015, 4:18 pm

This Week On Movie Monday

Yellowstone Caldera : 

The Biggest Volcanic Eruption Ever Awaits Mankind 


The Yellowstone Caldera is the volcanic caldera and supervolcano located in Yellowstone National Park in the United States, sometimes referred to as the Yellowstone Supervolcano. The caldera is located in the northwest corner of Wyoming, in which the vast majority of the park is contained. The major features of the caldera measure about 34 by 45 miles (55 by 72 km). The caldera formed during the last of three supereruptions over the past 2.1 million years. First came the Huckleberry Ridge eruption 2.1 million years ago, which created the Island Park Caldera and the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff. Next came the Mesa Falls eruption 1.3 million years ago, which created the Henry's Fork Caldera and the Mesa Falls Tuff. Finally came the Lava Creek eruption 640,000 years ago, which created the Yellowstone Caldera and the Lava Creek Tuff.

The last full-scale eruption of the Yellowstone Supervolcano, the Lava Creek eruption which happened nearly 640,000 years ago, ejected approximately 240 cubic miles (1,000 km3) of rock, dust and volcanic ash into the sky.

Geologists are closely monitoring the rise and fall of the Yellowstone Plateau, which measures on average 0.6 inches (1.5 cm) yearly, as an indication of changes in magma chamber pressure.

The upward movement of the Yellowstone caldera floor between 2004 and 2008 — almost 3 inches (7.6 cm) each year — was more than three times greater than ever observed since such measurements began in 1923. From mid-summer 2004 through mid-summer 2008, the land surface within the caldera moved upward as much as 8 inches (20 cm) at the White Lake GPS station. By the end of 2009, the uplift had slowed significantly and appeared to have stopped. In January 2010, the USGS stated that "uplift of the Yellowstone Caldera has slowed significantly" and that uplift continues but at a slower pace. The U.S. Geological Survey, University of Utah and National Park Service scientists with the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory maintain that they "see no evidence that another such cataclysmic eruption will occur at Yellowstone in the foreseeable future. Recurrence intervals of these events are neither regular nor predictable." This conclusion was reiterated in December 2013 in the aftermath of the publication of a study by University of Utah scientists finding that the "size of the magma body beneath Yellowstone is significantly larger than had been thought." The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory issued a statement on its website stating,

" Although fascinating, the new findings do not imply increased geologic hazards at Yellowstone, and certainly do not increase the chances of a 'supereruption' in the near future. Contrary to some media reports, Yellowstone is not 'overdue' for a supereruption. "

Other media reports were more hyperbolic in their coverage.

A study published in GSA Today identified three fault zones that future eruptions are most likely to be centered on. Two of those areas are associated with lava flows aged 174,000--70,000 years, and the third area is a focus of present-day seismicity.






 These films are presented as an exception to the copyright act as fair dealing for the purpose of research, private study, education, parody or satire. See bill c-42 article 29.
Author: The Prepared Canadian
Posted: January 6, 2015, 2:00 am

FrankWolfEpisode 24, Season 2

Saturday, January 03, 2014

  In this episode of the Barefoot Bushcraft Radio Show: - Year in Review - Invasive Species Not That Bad - Man Falls Into Niagara Falls Gorge - To Bug In or Bug Out? - Special Guest Frank Wolf
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Author: Barefoot Bushcraft
Posted: January 3, 2015, 4:00 pm




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